[EXCLUSIVE] “Our Careers Have Always Been A Lockdown” – Read About The Sacrifices Medical Frontliners Make To Keep Us Safe

You will appreciate your health more than ever after reading this post.

Dr Dhivya (left) with a colleague with a special message. Credit: Dr Dhivya Rajasingam

And most importantly, you’ll look at healthcare workers all over Malaysia in a very different light during this Covid-19 pandemic. Their whole lives, they have had to make sacrifices to make sure that you and the people of our country are healthy and safe. 

Yes, that’s right, their whole lives. 

“We miss birthdays and weddings and funerals because there is a life in need …

We eat, sleep, bathe and spend most of our spirits and souls either in the hospital or worrying about our patients and their condition.” – dr Dhivya Rajasingam, Anaesthesia and intensive care medical officer

#TeamCLEO got to speak to a medical frontliner who’s serving at Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru who opened up about what it takes to be a medical care officer serving in a time of a pandemic, and a crisis. 

This is what Dr Dhivya Rajasingam, an Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medical Officer posted onto her Facebook. Take the time to read every single line and passage to appreciate the severity of the situation, and what frontliners are doing in putting their lives on the line. 

“I am a doctor and here is my post.

Long before any of you have been forced into a lockdown, we medical personel [sic] have been in it. When the first Covid came around about 2 months ago, we started being on standby. Leaves were frozen and some of my comrades the iron lady being Dr Masliza said has been in a lockdown – dedicating her life to handling these cases 24/7. And now with the critically ill cases Dr Azmin, my intensivist.

For the rest of us, this career has always been a lockdown. We miss birthdays and weddings and funerals because there is a life in need. We are often confined in our own homes – either studying, preparing for cases, doing reports or just exhausted postcall. We eat, sleep, bathe and spend most of our spirits and souls either in the hospital or worrying about our patients and their condition.

We often have no time to go shopping, dining or anything else and live in our own social bubble. We rarely get to meet our non-medical friends and often it puts a strain on our relationships and we drift apart.

Please use this time to stay at home, stay safe and spend time with your loved ones while you can. As for me? I haven’t gotten to touch my dad or hug him or see his face or laugh with him. Because I am a frontliner and don’t want to risk transmission.

I can only pray to god that for all the lives i’ve saved he keeps my lifelines healthy.

As difficult as it is, we have to keep going. We have to keep smiling and find happiness in the smallest possible ways. Because we are the frontliners. We are here to save lives.”

Dr Dhivya (back row, middle, in blue) with her colleagues at HSAJB. Credit: Dr Dhivya Rajasingam

“Please use this time to stay at home, stay safe and spend time with your loved ones while u can. As for me? I haven’t gotten to touch my dad or hug him or see his face or laugh with him.” – dr Dhivya rajasingam

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And if you’re in lockdown at home with your family, consider yourself lucky. The medical frontliners aren’t able to contact their family or their loved ones because they’ve been exposed to the virus and risk transmission.

“I haven’t seen my parents because long before the lockdown I put myself in isolation because I was treating Covid positive patients,” said Dr Dhivya.

And because of the specific tasks she has as Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medical Officer, she handles ICU patients up close who require ventilation. Because they need ventilation these specific officers are dealing very close to the patients’ noses and mouths.

So for you, What’s the most important thing to know or what can we do to help? “There are individuals who are refusing to get tested refusing to stay indoors … Just stay at home and stay safe,” she said. 

And lastly, she said, “Pray for me. I miss my family, I miss my parents.” 

 

Thank you, Dr Dhivya, and to all the medical care officers working in the frontline to keep Malaysia safe.Credit: Dr Dhivya Rajasingam

For more of an update at this time, there are a total of 8 deaths in the country.

Director General of Health, Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah has posted this update to his Facebook account for a clearer understanding of the cases.

We implore everyone to heed the doctors’ advices to stay indoors, and to stay safe.